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Session - Integrative - 75.0 mins - Room 1
Vajrayana (Tibetan) meditation techniques include mindfulness practices, but also tantric meditations, often as healing practices. Most research and western cultural understandings of meditation are based on mindfulness practices. This paper reviews the difference between mindfulness and tantric meditations, and how they differ in practice, in their effects on the autonomic nervous system, on the brain, the mind and wellbeing. It then summarises the latest research on neuro-immunology and mind-body therapies (MBT) to outline the mechanisms by which meditation improves health, wellbeing and immunity  Participants will be guided in non-sectarian meditations to form an experiential understanding of the different meditation practices, and how they might be used in everyday life to improve wellbeing, immunity, and enhance recovery from sickness and injury. Finally, comments will be offered on how this could be applied to our veterinary patients.
Vajrayana (Tibetan) meditation techniques include mindfulness practices, but also tantric meditations, often as healing practices. Most research and western cultural understandings of meditation are based on mindfulness practices. This paper reviews the difference between mindfulness and tantric meditations, and how they differ in practice, in their effects on the autonomic nervous system, on the brain, the mind and wellbeing. It then summarises the latest research on neuro-immunology and mind-body therapies (MBT) to outline the mechanisms by which meditation improves health, wellbeing and immunity  Participants will be guided in non-sectarian meditations to form an experiential understanding of the different meditation practices, and how they might be used in everyday life to improve wellbeing, immunity, and enhance recovery from sickness and injury. Finally, comments will be offered on how this could be applied to our veterinary patients.
Session - Animal Welfare & Ethics - 75.0 mins - Room 2
Unowned domestic cats (Felis catus, ‘strays’) are a major management and conservation issue in many parts of the world, including Australia. Although the number of stray cats is unknown, approximately 50% of cats entering Australian shelters are classified as ‘stray’. Many of these cats are euthanased because of illness or aggressive temperament. Depending on shelter circumstances some cats may euthanased because of limited resources. There is also a human cost, with regular or large-scale euthanasia linked to poor mental health. In addition to concerns about euthanasia and health, free-roaming stray (and pet) cats create serious problems including possible disease and parasite transmission to other cats, wildlife and people, predation of wildlife, sub-lethal effects on prey species (e.g. avoidance-through-fear). Free-roaming cats are also vulnerable to vehicle collisions, accidental poisoning, and human persecution. Cats also cause significant nuisance for cat owners and non-cat owners alike through urine spraying, caterwauling, and fighting with other cats. Management plans for stray cats need to consider these issues as well as the impact on individual strays and people performing euthanasia.
Desexing stray cats and releasing them back onto the streets (termed Trap-Neuter-Release, ‘TNR’) is a strategy developed by cat lovers to prevent breeding, nuisance behaviour and euthanasia. Since its establishment, TNR has been increasingly advocated as an effective, humane and ethical solution to problems caused by stray cats living alongside humans. However, in Australia, TNR has previously been rejected as an inappropriate management strategy for stray cats by the New South Wales Government and the AVA, because of tenuous evidence that the strategy achieves its fundamental objectives. Nonetheless, TNR programmes do operate and some NGOs and veterinarians are calling for trials and widespread implementation of TNR in Australian cities. 
However, existing data indicate that TNR falls short of these objectives because: (i) it is only effective under particular conditions of high management intensity and funding, and in closed populations, (ii) it is slow to achieve reductions/extinction, (iii) a high proportion of reductions comes from adoption, which can be implemented without TNR, (iv) desexed cats are returned to the environment, which does little to mitigate the major problems associated with free-roaming cats, (v) the fate of cats released back onto streets is unknown, (vi) TNR programmes do not necessarily prevent euthanasia, and, (vii) the provision of care by TNR programmes encourages the dumping of pet cats. 
TNR proponents agree that some evidence currently available for TNR is not robust and use this as justification for advocating trials of TNR in Australia. Proponents also argue that the problems caused by stray cats in urban areas are exaggerated and attributable to other factors (e.g. impact of cat predation on wildlife is negligible in comparison with land clearing). However, I argue that presenting TNR as a solution to cat overpopulation is too simplistic, and that trials of TNR could actually damage efforts to increase responsible pet ownership and compliance with legal mandates relating to cats. Humane management of stray cats can be achieved with well-funded and coordinated adoption-programmes and increased community education about responsible pet ownership. The veterinary profession can assist efforts to manage stray cats by promoting and practicing Early Age Desexing of pet cats, offering discounted desexing to owners and shelters, offering adoption of shelter cats in private practices, and by complying with AVA recommendations and State legislations that prohibit TNR in Australia.


Australian Community Cat Program: Managing domestic cats humanely and scientifically

Session - Business - 75.0 mins - Room 3
When Dr. Rod Irwin purchased his veterinary clinic, he soon discovered it was making a loss. With no training in business management, he plunged on, but eight years later he was over one million dollars in debt. It nearly killed him—crippling anxiety, mind-numbing insomnia, even a near death experience.
 
By chance he was given a book which changed his life. Rod discovered how to use neuroscience and positive psychology to “wire his brain for success”. When he applied this little-known science to his business, it totally changed everything: happy clients, a highly motivated team, a 712% jump in profits. He created the business life of his dreams, and it totally transformed his life—to one of calmness, confidence, and a love of living. 

In this presentation he will briefly relate his backstory, outline how your brain works, and then describe The 12 Keys to Wire Your Brain for Success—all based on neuroscience. His goal is to help professionals optimise their thinking and emotions, create the business life of their dreams, and live a life they love! 

  When Dr. Rod Irwin purchased his veterinary clinic, he soon discovered it was making a loss. With no training in business management, he plunged on, but eight years later he was over one million dollars in debt. It nearly killed him—crippling anxiety, mind-numbing insomnia, even a near death experience.
 
By chance he was given a book which changed his life. Rod discovered how to use neuroscience and positive psychology to “wire his brain for success”. When he applied this little-known science to his business, it totally changed everything: happy clients, a highly motivated team, a 712% jump in profits. He created the business life of his dreams, and it totally transformed his life—to one of calmness, confidence, and a love of living. 

In this presentation he will briefly relate his backstory, outline how your brain works, and then describe The 12 Keys to Wire Your Brain for Success—all based on neuroscience. His goal is to help professionals optimise their thinking and emotions, create the business life of their dreams, and live a life they love! 
Session - Animal Welfare & Ethics - 75.0 mins - Room 2
Understanding consumers' perception and relative value of animal welfare


 | The kangaroo industry in Australia is one of the best managed wildlife harvests in the world based as it is on a sound understanding of the ecology of the kangaroo, adjustable quotas and monitoring of population size. It has long been argued that kangaroos should have a value for landholders and that the formation of cooperatives, working with the commercial industry and sharing profits, would improve land management, biodiversity and ultimately the welfare of kangaroos by changing their status from being a ‘pest’ to being part of the production system.    In Australia total grazing pressure is an important consideration in livestock production and maintenance of biodiversity. In the western rangelands of NSW in 2016 landholders had become increasingly concerned about the pressure on the land as a result of massively increased numbers of kangaroos and concerned about the animal welfare implications of drought.    A workshop was held in Cobar in September 2016, a joint initiative of the Western Lands Advisory Council and Local Land Services Western Region aimed at developing an informed and collaborative approach to sustainable kangaroo management in western NSW. Workshop members included landholders, aboriginal groups, government, kangaroo harvesters, kangaroo industry, kangaroo ecologists, veterinarians, the AVA and RSPCA. The Kangaroo Management Taskforce emerged out of this workshop to continue the discussion and the Taskforce demonstrates how groups and individuals with different views can work together to improve animal welfare. The Taskforce has been instrumental in organising two kangaroo symposiums, in Canberra at the Rangelands Conference and in Launceston at the Ecological Society of Australia Conference, to raise awareness of the issue and to present the latest science.
Session - Animal Welfare & Ethics - 75.0 mins - Room 3
Luxation injuries occur when the dentoalveolar apparatus is disrupted causing displacement of the tooth from its normal position within the alveolus, with or without concurrent fracture of the alveolus. Avulsion injuries occur when there is complete displacement of the tooth from the socket. Extra-alveolar time, transportation in an appropriate storage media, and handling require special considerations to avoid negative pulpodentinal outcomes in teeth intended for replantation. Consequences of these injuries include loss of tooth vitality and root resorption or ankylosis.  This lecture will cover management and treatment of these injuries in companion animals. 
 | How often do you brush your teeth? Now, ask yourself, how often do you brush your pet’s teeth? Tooth brushing is the gold standard method of reducing plaque in cats and dogs at home. Successful treatment and prevention of periodontal disease requires a combination of professional treatment in the clinic and a personalised dental homecare regime. This needs to be integrated and delivered in a manner that is realistic, achievable and affordable for both pet owners and practitioners. This session will provide you with the valuable information you need to convince your colleagues and clients that together we can make a difference to pet dental care at home and that clients can have fun whilst they’re doing it. We will cover when, why and how to perform tooth brushing and how this can improve the animal-human bond. We will also discuss how this can improve patient compliance for veterinary examination and potentially lead to the early detection of oral and dental disease. Don’t forget old dogs can learn new tricks.
Session - Animal Welfare & Ethics - 60.0 mins -
Australian Veterinarians for Animal Welfare and Ethics (AVAWE) invite you to forget about COVID-19 and to catch up with fellow members of AVAWE for a fun and friendly night. Have a glass of bubbly in hand. On the night we will be hosting a fancy dress themed night and invite you to dress up as your favourite animal! We will split attendees up into ‘Zoom Breakout rooms’ so you can have a close-knit chat with a smaller group. 
Session - Integrative - 60.0 mins -
Did you have questions about integrative medicine? Curious to know how it can be incorporated into your practice? If you'd like to know more about this rapidly growing area of Vet medicine join us at Happy Hour and ask members of the group any questions you are curious about. You'll find we are interesting and engaging, very friendly and supportive group. BYO beverage of choice!
 
To register please click here.
#VetFest 2020
VetFest 2020
#VetFest 2020
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