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Session - Business - 75.0 mins - Room 1
A focus on investing in your people to enable you to lead and facilitate your team's journey that will support and guide them along a career pathway that aligns with your practice focus and culture. 
HR Best Practice: implementing the very best staff recruitment and retention strategies in vet practice today. Introduction to the AVA Gold Star Employer of Choice program (Part 2)
Session - Corporate Supporter Session - 75.0 mins - Room 2
Australian Wildlife Health Institute - concept, terms of reference and next steps 
Recently, the concept to establish a new Australian institute for applied wildlife health science, the Australian Wildlife Health Institute (AWHI), was launched. A workshop was held in November 2019 with key wildlife management agencies and research organisations to determine support for the concept and establish the terms of reference for this initiative should it proceed. It was agreed that AWHI should be an inclusive, highly multidisciplinary collaboration between stakeholders, researchers and communities, integrating Australia’s research and training capacity to deliver solutions for priority wildlife health problems. The initiative is about to embark on the development of a research, training and engagement roadmap and proposal phase and is seeking engagement from those interested.
 | Declining population sizes of koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) in SE Queensland, Australia can partially be attributed to chlamydiosis, the most documented and serious disease of koalas, characterized by ocular, urinary, and reproductive lesions. Although the disease is not necessarily fatal, chlamydiosis results in hundreds of koalas being presented to koala hospitals in Queensland each year; these animals are either treated or euthanased. Studies related to the incidence and pathology of Chlamydia infection and its effect on male reproduction are extremely limited, so that the impact of this disease on wild koala populations has most likely been underestimated. This presentation will explore the epidemiology of Chlamydia pecorum infection in the male urogenital tract from wild (hospitalized and free-ranging) koalas in SE QLD, investigate whether Chlamydia-induced pathology can either be a direct negative effect on the sperm cell or an indirect effect associated with infection leading to inflammatory obstruction of the seminiferous tubules and/or epithelial damage that results in impaired spermatogenesis and sperm transport. Furthermore, this study presents the first empirical evidence that Chlamydia is indeed a venereal transmitted disease in the koala, as demonstrated by successfully inoculating a cell line in vitro with naturally-infected koala semen.
Session - Dental - 75.0 mins - Room 3
 Radiographs are an essential tool in the practitioners kit when performing equine dentistry. This lecture is a step by step method on how to take diagnostic radiographs for dentistry and the paranasal sinuses.  Follow the 6 EASY STEPS for taking diagnostic dental radiographs with:  1. Patient Setup  2. Equipment  3. Indications for  4. Positioning, distance and factors  5. What not do to  6. Tips to get it right the first time  and follow the 7 GOLDEN RULES to take great shots, every time, to assist in your diagnosis and treatment planning:  1. Adequate sedation to minimise motion  2. Take more than one shot  3. Open the mouth  4. Get setup before you start  5. Positioning tips  6. Shoot the opposite side  7. Compare to reference radiographs
Sinus flaps and trephination are useful surgical technique when investigating and treating dental and paranasal sinus disease in the horse. The large size of the equine head lends itself to mostly easy access to the paranasal sinuses (PNS) however a detailed knowledge of the complex anatomy and normal landmarks is paramount. There are six paired paranasal sinuses and conchal sinuses, each of which either directly or indirectly communicate with each other and the nasal passage.
Trephination of the PNS is a procedure that can be performed in the field with a relatively small amount of equipment.  It is important that the practitioner is familiar with the normal anatomy and appearance of the sinus as disease readily distorts normal architecture and is further complicated by the presence of fluid (purulent material or blood), foodstuff or inspissated pus.

Most commonly trephination or sinus flaps are made over the rostral maxillary, caudal maxillary and conchofrontal sinuses. Trephinations are useful for investigation (fluid sampling, endoscopic examination) and some treatment (removal of purulent material and lavaging), while sinus flaps generally give a larger field of view and access for soft tissue removal (neoplasms and masses) and removal of inspissated pus.
Session - Animal Welfare & Ethics, Cattle - 105.0 mins - Room 1
 | The viewpoint of the Australian public towards animal welfare in the live export industry has previously been explored; however, the attitudes of people who work in the industry is unknown. A survey was completed by 265 people including producers, feedlot and shipboard workers, veterinarians and exporters. The survey was completed in English, Arabic, Bangla, Vietnamese, Filipino, Bahasa Indonesian and covered participants from Australia/ New Zealand, SE Asia and the Middle East. The majority of respondents agreed/strongly agreed (97%) that ‘livestock should be treated with respect’, that ‘livestock have feelings’ (88%), that ‘when moving livestock, it is better to remain calm than shout in a loud voice’ (88%) and that ‘it is important to move livestock slowly’ (89%). While many believed that animal welfare in their workplace was satisfactory, many suggested improvements. Subsequently, respondents were found to show empathy and compassion towards their charges and consider the welfare of the animals as important. Participants also demonstrated a commitment to improving welfare in their workplace. Mann-Whitney U tests found that some responses differed according to nationality, religion, role in industry and age. Non-Australians, those describing themselves as religious and people aged over 30 years were more likely to disagree with the statement ‘hitting cattle helps when moving them’. These results challenge the previously proposed theory that workers involved with exported livestock have an inhumane attitude towards the animals under their care. This survey is an important step towards addressing these misconceptions and to help determine ways to facilitate industry improvement in animal welfare.
Cattle feedlot environments are often described as barren, providing limited opportunity for cattle to perform their full behavioural repertoire. The general public are becoming more interested in animal welfare, requiring industries to be transparent in how animals are treated and be able to prove a quality of life. Therefore, providing feedlot cattle with an opportunity to perform more natural behaviours could lead, not only to an improved quality of life at the feedlot, but may also impact productivity. While enrichment for dairy cattle has been investigated, studies on a commercial scale in feedlots are minimal. Our project looked at providing exercise as a form of enrichment, where cattle were let into the laneway for a period of time or moved calmly around their pen using low-stress stock handling. How these enrichments impacted cattle temperament (through crush scores and exit speeds, avoidance tests and novel person tests) and behaviour (ethogram) over a 40day period will be discussed. 

 | Animal welfare monitoring protocols currently used by the Australian livestock export industry rely on the use of input measures relating to environment, resources and management, and outputs relating to morbidity and mortality. More recently, animal behavioural outcomes have been recognised as important indicators of welfare for animals in all livestock production systems. Our research project has created a system for recording the welfare conditions of cattle and sheep in the Australian livestock export supply chain. We used a suite of easily defined and universally understood measures to explore the links between environmental and management conditions and the health and behavioural outcomes for cattle and sheep during the live export process. Four consignments of cattle and three consignments of sheep were assessed at different stages of the export supply chain by a pen side observer. Measurements were taken in Australian pre-export facilities, at multiple times of the day on each day during the sea voyage, and in destination feedlots and quarantine centres. The protocol has proven to successfully record behavioural changes as animals become habituated to intensive management practices during the export process. Links between behaviour and health outcomes with changing environmental conditions and resource access were also detected. Preliminary data analysis aims to determine how many animals constitute a representative sample, and the sampling frequency required to provide accurate insight into the welfare of the whole consignment. Our data have indicated that, during a sea voyage, assessments must be made from different lines of livestock and from areas of the ship that differ in environmental conditions or resource access. Multiple daily sampling is required to show patterns of appropriate activity and resting behaviour, as well as responses to changing conditions such as heat and respite periods. Decisions about the impacts of management and environmental conditions, the suitability of livestock and the regulation of industry, can be better informed by taking a whole of supply chain approach to assessing and reporting on animal-based outcomes for live sheep and cattle exported from Australia.
Session - Behaviour - 105.0 mins - Room 2
Medications for Behaviour Cases - what, when, why and complex cases  (Part 1)
Medications for Behaviour Cases - what, when, why and complex cases  (Part 2)
Research is being carried out to look at benefits of using Zylkene® over placebo to reduce fear in dogs presenting for veterinary examination. This presentation will review the mechanism of action of α-casozepine, which is the active ingredient of Zylkene. Although the biological action of α-casozepine, anecdotal reports from pet owners and the work of previous studies all support its use, there have been no studies to give evidence of benefit when used as a situational calming agent for veterinary clinic visits. The current research as well as previous studies will be discussed.
Session - Equine - 105.0 mins - Room 3
An ethogram is a series of behaviours each with strict definitions. The Ridden Horse Pain Ethogram (RHpE) comprises 24 behaviours, the majority of which are at least 10 times more likely to be seen in horses with musculoskeletal pain compared with non-lame horses. The display of ≥ 8 behaviours of the RHpE is highly likely to reflect the presence of musculoskeletal pain, although some lame horses score < 8. The median score for non-lame horses has ranged from 2 to 3 in a variety of studies.  Diagnostic anaesthesia which abolishes lameness results in an immediate substantial reduction in the RHpE score.  Persistence of ≥ 8 behaviours is likely to reflect an additional problem, such as a poorly fitting saddle. The RHpE can be uses to assist in recognising pain-related poor performance and at pre-purchase examinations. Correct application of the RHpE, like any clinical tool, requires appropriate training and practice.
An ethogram is a series of behaviours each with strict definitions. The Ridden Horse Pain Ethogram (RHpE) comprises 24 behaviours, the majority of which are at least 10 times more likely to be seen in horses with musculoskeletal pain compared with non-lame horses. The display of ≥ 8 behaviours of the RHpE is highly likely to reflect the presence of musculoskeletal pain, although some lame horses score < 8. The median score for non-lame horses has ranged from 2 to 3 in a variety of studies.  Diagnostic anaesthesia which abolishes lameness results in an immediate substantial reduction in the RHpE score.  Persistence of ≥ 8 behaviours is likely to reflect an additional problem, such as a poorly fitting saddle. The RHpE can be uses to assist in recognising pain-related poor performance and at pre-purchase examinations. Correct application of the RHpE, like any clinical tool, requires appropriate training and practice.
Session - Dental - 60.0 mins -
We invite you to attend the first AVDS virtual networking happy hour! Catch up with peers and new friends to discuss recently presented topics. The virtual happy hour gives you an opportunity to connect with many like-minded professionals from across the country.

To register please click here.
Session - Conservation Biology - 60.0 mins -
Join us at the conclusion of VetFest for a virtual fireside drinks and chat! Catch up with peers in a relaxed, light-hearted setting (you can even wear your PJs!). Connect with like-minded colleagues over a glass of wine, cheese & bikkies, as you would at the end of a day on a field trip, huddled around a roaring campfire. Speakers from the VetFest AVCB stream will join in, and host Phil Tucak will keep the conversation flowing with some 'wildlife of the world' trivia!  
#VetFest 2020
VetFest 2020
#VetFest 2020
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