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VetFest 2021
VetFest 2021 Virtual Conference
VetFest 2021
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This session is brought to you by Hill's Pet Nutrition
Through the medium of a case study we will explore assessing cases using logical clinical problem solving (LCPS) approach and discuss several diagnostic dilemmas 
Through the medium of a case study we will explore assessing cases using logical clinical problem solving (LCPS) approach and discuss several diagnostic dilemmas 
How often do you use evidence to aid your decision-making process?

Integrating evidence based veterinary medicine (EBVM) and research into clinical practice, can have enormous benefits for our patients and practices, enabling greater standards of care and improved outcomes through supporting decision making with tangible evidence. 

In these two presentations, Dr Lindsay Evans discusses the principles of evidence-based medicine and research, including the Ask, Acquire, Appraise, Apply and Assess process.  As well as the evidence based veterinary medicine methodology, she will discuss the benefits of using these frameworks, and the best ways to integrate these strategies into practice, so we can embrace the science of veterinary science in a relevant and useful way for day to day practice, while retaining the focus on the individual needs of the patients we are treating. 

As well as looking at the theory behind why we should encourage evidence based veterinary medicine, Lindsay will discuss the challenges in accessing and integrating this information, as well as strategies and tools that can be used to make the implementation of evidence based medicine practical, accessible and streamlined across all areas of the veterinary practice. 

How often do you use evidence to aid your decision-making process?

Integrating evidence based veterinary medicine (EBVM) and research into clinical practice, can have enormous benefits for our patients and practices, enabling greater standards of care and improved outcomes through supporting decision making with tangible evidence. 

In these two presentations, Dr Lindsay Evans discusses the principles of evidence-based medicine and research, including the Ask, Acquire, Appraise, Apply and Assess process.  As well as the evidence based veterinary medicine methodology, she will discuss the benefits of using these frameworks, and the best ways to integrate these strategies into practice, so we can embrace the science of veterinary science in a relevant and useful way for day to day practice, while retaining the focus on the individual needs of the patients we are treating. 

As well as looking at the theory behind why we should encourage evidence based veterinary medicine, Lindsay will discuss the challenges in accessing and integrating this information, as well as strategies and tools that can be used to make the implementation of evidence based medicine practical, accessible and streamlined across all areas of the veterinary practice. 

This session is brought to you by Hill's Pet Nutrition
 
This short presentation will look at problem-solving techniques around a common practice dilemma – what to feed your patient when they have multiple medical conditions.
This presentation will outline our next steps in the development of a sustainable model for measurable change to mental health in the veterinary industry.
Flash glucose monitoring using the Freestyle Libre system is a practical method of obtaining continuous glucose data from diabetic dogs and cats, and is much more affordable and available than other continuous glucose monitors. However, the device can generate a lot of data, which can initially seem overwhelming for both the owner and the vet. It does not require calibration with blood glucose concentration. Instead the adhesive sensor disc is simply scanned by the reader or phone App to obtain a ‘flash’ of the current and previous 8 hours of glucose data. The information is stored in the reader or phone App and can also be uploaded to generate detailed reports. Each sensor will last for up to 14 days and so provides much more information than standard blood glucose curves.

The pros and cons of this new glucose monitoring technology will be discussed as well as practical tips on how to best incorporate it into your practice. Guidelines will be presented for setting clear goals and for interpretation of the glucose results to achieve better patient outcomes.
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Room 2 - Equine
Equine - Room 2
This short presentation will look at problem-solving techniques around a common practice dilemma – what to feed your patient when they have multiple medical conditions.
We can't reduce levels of obesity in horses unless we can first get horse owners to change their behaviour. And changing people is the tricky bit! Using insights from behaviour change science and data from a three-year study of horse owners and equine professionals around equine obesity, this talk will explore the issues around equine obesity and the ways in which vets can inspire change, ultimately improving equine welfare.
An angular limb deformity refers to an axial deviation of a limb when viewed on the frontal plane. It is well known that a certain amount of deviation is normal in foals, with the vast majority not requiring surgical intervention. These axial deviations can be combined with a rotational or flexural deformity and many conditions best observed to be dynamic, changing as the foal develops. Serial evaluation and treatment of limb deviations is therefore, an integral component of the management on many breeding operations. Whether the foal is intended for racing, commercial sale, showing, or other athletic careers, good conformation is essential for maintaining an athletically sound horse. Due to the dynamic nature of these angular deformities, no set of rules exist dictating the management techniques (conservative or surgical) that should be universally applied.
Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global problem with implications for both human and equine health. AMR in horses poses a threat not only to the individual horse but also to the owners and caregivers. Antimicrobial products are widely used in the treatment of many infectious conditions in horses and their use is vitally important in maintaining health and welfare. However, increasingly, bacteria are developing resistance to antimicrobial products leading to increasing reports of resistant infections in a range of bacterial species. Surveillance of AMR in clinical isolates is important in order to monitor and detect emerging resistance patterns and to guide policies on antimicrobial use and empirical therapy.   
 
This session will detail results from recent studies to understand the AMR patterns of common groups of bacteria from clinical diagnostic submissions from horses in the UK and from an in-depth study in referral hospitals to determine prevalence and distribution, of AMR in faeces, the environment and surgical site infection (SSI) how this varies by sample site and type of submitting veterinary practice. 
 
It is well established that antimicrobial use is one of the main drivers for selection of AMR therefore appropriate use of antimicrobials across all species is essential to preserve their efficacy especially with limited treatment options in the horse due to a limited number of drugs being authorised for use in this species, cost implications and safety concerns due to hindgut fermentation.  
 
Antimicrobial stewardship is a coherent set of actions to promote responsible use of antimicrobials to preserve future effectiveness and this session will also cover initiatives in the UK veterinary sector to encourage responsible use of antimicrobials, including results of a BEVA led survey to outline the current antimicrobial practices of veterinary surgeons in equine practice, including antimicrobial choice and the use of surveillance, audit, guidelines and policies to inform good antimicrobial stewardship.
This session brought to you by Greencross Vets
This short presentation will look at problem-solving techniques around a common practice dilemma – what to feed your patient when they have multiple medical conditions.
 
Veterinary visits are a very stressful event for our patients, fear and anxiety are increasing recognized during veterinary procedures. Studies show that that over three quarters of our patients show signs of stress and anxiety when on the examination table. Fear can lead to aggressive displays which are a safety concern for the staff, the caretaker and the animal itself. Furthermore, extreme fearful and aggressive behaviour may lead to deferred veterinary care, compromise the human-animal bond and lead to a loss of confidence of the caretaker towards the veterinary team.
  
There are may things we can do to decrease fear and anxiety and consequently improve the welfare the animal; pre-veterinary visit pharmaceutics is one important tool we use. Administering anxiolytics and/or antidepressants prior to the veterinary visit can make the pet’s experience much less stressful and make the veterinary visit a good experience for the animal, his caretaker and the veterinary team. 
All behaviour cases should start with an animal's primary veterinary care provider. This professional has a relationship with the patient and owner and can rapidly identify behavioural changes and possible underlying physical maladies. From there, as with any other case, the sooner diagnostics, diagnoses, treatment (+/- referral) occur, the better the prognosis. 

A behaviour triage appointment is a practical way to open a dialogue with pet owners about behavioural concerns, and to commence the necessary diagnostics, treatment or referral. They are efficient, convenient for clients, useful for all manner of clinician (regardless of interest level in behaviour cases!) and subsequently offer major benefits for our patients.