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VetFest 2021
VetFest 2021 Virtual Conference
VetFest 2021
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Some of the most critical pathogens of wildlife involve environmental transmission. Emblematic of this is sarcoptic mange disease impacting bare-nosed wombats in Australia. The etiologic agent of mange disease, the Sarcoptes scabiei mite, occurs worldwide, has been documented to infect >100 species across 10 mammalian orders, and is among the 30 most prevalent diseases of humans (scabies). In Australia this mite was evidently introduced by European settlers and causes significant welfare issues to wombats, periodic epizootics and population declines. There remains much to be learned about this environmentally transmitted wildlife disease and how to manage it. I will summarise the efforts of my research group to uncover the impacts and epidemiology of mange disease in wombats, and our efforts to establish feasible in situ disease control. Our research spans within and between individual effects to population-scales, invasion history, modelling, and applied management.
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Room 3 - Dental, brought to you by Jurox
Dental - Room 3
This session brought to you by Jurox
The most common abnormality in canine tooth position in cats is mesioversion of the maxillary canine. As a result
there is often labioversion of the mandibular canine.  The maxillary canine may cause trauma to the oral mucosa where it contacts the lip  and the mandibular canine may cause trauma to the upper lip due to its abnormal angulation.
 
Malocclusion in premolar and molar teeth refers mostly to abnormal position of  these teeth which causes contact point of the premolar and molar teeth of the opposite arcade and forms due to impingement of the mucosa. It appear as a gingival cleft, granulation, or ulceration. Biopsy is indicated to rule out malignancy. Immediate resolution of symptoms can be observed after either coronal reduction or extraction of the offending tooth. 
 
This  malocclusion resulting from impingement of the maxillary fourth premolar (108/208) on the oral mucosa around the mandibular first molar (309/409) occurs in British Shorthairs, Maine Coons and other exotic short- and longhair breeds but not only.  It arises due to the slight linguoversion of the cusps of the maxillary third
and fourth premolars (107 and 108; 207 and 208) and also the thicker mandibular width of the affected cat. Additionally angulation of maxillary premolars may play a role in development of this problem. 
 
Treatment options and solutions are focused on early identification of unfavourable trend  and intervention particularly in predisposed breeds. Odontoplasty, crown height reduction of maloccluding teeth or their extraction is another direction. In some cases possible option may be corrective orthodontic procedures.
This lecture will aim to cover the features of a normal occlusion (‘scissor bite’) as well as the defining characteristics of Class I-IV malocclusions to assist with diagnosis and treatment planning. Malocclusion that are considered traumatic, canine linguoversion leading to palatal trauma, can lead to acute and chronic pain states in the affected patients, which then impacts on the patient’s quality of life. Various intervention strategies are feasible dependent on the age at which the animal is diagnosed with the malocclusion, and can be categorized into preventative, interceptive and corrective treatment modalities, which will be discussed through presentation of clinical cases.
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Room 1 - Animal Welfare & Ethics
The Five Domains Model has been used to guide assessment of animal welfare for 25 years and has been regularly extended and updated during that time to reflect evolution of thinking and knowledge about animals and their welfare. Using the model, information about the observable/ measurable state of the animal is compiled in four physical/functional domains relating to its: 1. Nutrition/Hydration; 2. Physical Environment; 3. Health; and 4. Behavioural Interactions. This information is then used to cautiously infer the animal’s likely mental experiences, which are most relevant to its welfare state, in Domain 5: Mental State. Negative experiences such as thirst, hunger, breathlessness or pain arise in Domain 5 from factors that disturb or disrupt the internal stability of the body (evidence in Domains 1-3) or when the animal is stopped from achieving strongly motivated behavioural goals to interact with the environment and other animals, e.g. fear or frustration (evidence in Domain 4). Positive experiences such as pleasures of eating or thermal comfort may arise when the animal has opportunities to maintain or restore its internal physical stability (Domains 1-3) or when it can achieve its goals, e.g. pleasure and safety of companionship (Domain 4). The latest version of the model focusses attention on the welfare implications of animals’ various interactions with humans, primarily through evidence compiled in Domain 4. The model has specific advantages in a veterinary context including making it easier to explain the welfare significance of clinical signs, facilitating more holistic welfare assessments and encouraging vets and those in charge of animals to seek opportunities for animals to have positive experiences. 
The Five Domains Model has been used to guide assessment of animal welfare for 25 years and has been regularly extended and updated during that time to reflect evolution of thinking and knowledge about animals and their welfare. Using the model, information about the observable/ measurable state of the animal is compiled in four physical/functional domains relating to its: 1. Nutrition/Hydration; 2. Physical Environment; 3. Health; and 4. Behavioural Interactions. This information is then used to cautiously infer the animal’s likely mental experiences, which are most relevant to its welfare state, in Domain 5: Mental State. Negative experiences such as thirst, hunger, breathlessness or pain arise in Domain 5 from factors that disturb or disrupt the internal stability of the body (evidence in Domains 1-3) or when the animal is stopped from achieving strongly motivated behavioural goals to interact with the environment and other animals, e.g. fear or frustration (evidence in Domain 4). Positive experiences such as pleasures of eating or thermal comfort may arise when the animal has opportunities to maintain or restore its internal physical stability (Domains 1-3) or when it can achieve its goals, e.g. pleasure and safety of companionship (Domain 4). The latest version of the model focusses attention on the welfare implications of animals’ various interactions with humans, primarily through evidence compiled in Domain 4. The model has specific advantages in a veterinary context including making it easier to explain the welfare significance of clinical signs, facilitating more holistic welfare assessments and encouraging vets and those in charge of animals to seek opportunities for animals to have positive experiences. 
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Room 2 - Behaviour, brought to you by Catnets
Behaviour - Room 2
This session brought to you by Catnets
Since I first introduced the concept of Puppy Preschool to Australia at the AVA conference in Adelaide last century (1990s not 1890's ) they have really taken off, not only nationally but also Internationally. The idea was to help make vet visits better for the pups, and hence for the staff as well as the owners. they were also designed to educate puppy owners about why dogs do what they do and teach pups good manners. Unfortunately as I now watch them things have not turned out as I thought. Some things are better, some things are worse and some things have not changed. Come learn the good, the bad and the ugly from the person who started it all!
Air travel is becoming increasingly popular in pets.
Over 2 million pets and other live animals are transported by air every year in the United States alone (US Department of Transportation, 2020) with data and numbers lacking for other countries and regions.
The nature of air travel is stressful for pets, which was corroborated in a study in 2002 investigating physiological signs and behaviour of dogs during air transport. Some of the main causes of stress include environmental factors such as sights, smells and sounds, separation from social affiliates, removal from territories and lack of control and predictability.
My clinic is based in the UAE, a country with a large and transient ex-pat population and pet relocation via air travel has been a substantial part of my business for the last 13 years. We transport between 250 and 300 animals every year with a high focus on stress management and preservation of welfare during the process. 
In this presentation, I look forward to introducing you to our approach to stress management prior to, during and after air travel using a 360-degree approach to mental, emotional and physical health and welfare factors. 
I will present some case examples of both dogs and cats and how we managed the pet's individual needs, requirements and challenges. 
I will discuss positive reinforcement methods for crate familiarisation, safe anxiolytic medication and supplemental products to relieve stress as well as strategies that can be implemented upon arrival at the destination to help pets settle into their new homes and environments.  
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Room 3 - Equine
Equine - Room 3
The Equine stifle is fascinating as the accurate diagnosis and effective treatment of problems at this site remains a challenge for equine veterinarians.  It is the largest and most complex joint. Although there have been major advances in imaging of the stifle in recent years, many of the technologies are not accessible and standard imaging (radiographs and ultrasound) remain a mainstay of diagnosis in the field. A solid knowledge of stifle anatomy, age and site predilection of common lesions is essential for an accurate diagnosis of stifle pathology. A variety of topics will be covered spanning maturation of the stifle with associated pathology in juvenile horses, cysts,  meniscal disease and osteoarthritis, amongst others.
The Equine stifle is fascinating as the accurate diagnosis and effective treatment of problems at this site remains a challenge for equine veterinarians.  It is the largest and most complex joint. Although there have been major advances in imaging of the stifle in recent years, many of the technologies are not accessible and standard imaging (radiographs and ultrasound) remain a mainstay of diagnosis in the field. A solid knowledge of stifle anatomy, age and site predilection of common lesions is essential for an accurate diagnosis of stifle pathology. A variety of topics will be covered spanning maturation of the stifle with associated pathology in juvenile horses, cysts,  meniscal disease and osteoarthritis, amongst others.